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Love me to Infinity ♥

hey ! the name is
iris Gayle
Here's a PAGE of RANDOMNESS :) Life is hard, Oh! well, it was never easy !
I'll feel infinite one day☮
being closer to you is my SWEETEST ESCAPE

Jul 24th at 9AM / via: missteeles / op: missteeles / 17,691 notes

Fifty Shades Of Grey - Trailer


Jul 23rd at 10AM / via: sjnk / op: naughty-couples / 190,442 notes

(Source: naughty-couples)


Jul 23rd at 6AM / via: piqueque / op: piqueque / 1,783 notes

"We gave absolutely everything, but it wasn’t enough to win the cup. But we think that, maybe, we still gave the fans some joy. We went to Brazil with many doubts, but we came back stronger than ever. We will keep on working hard to bring joy to the country."


Jul 22nd at 8AM / via: struckbyastar / op: struckbyastar / 1,291 notes

"There are 41 wars being fought around the world right now. Most of us are busy and we race through our weeks without paying a great deal of attention, but yesterday this week stopped, because one of those wars reached into the sky and grabbed 298 people who could have been any of us." 

Jul 22nd at 8AM / via: jordanfifer / op: jordanfifer / 17,093 notes

CBS’ Scott Pelley, commenting on our shared humanity, after the missile attack of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 (source)


Jul 22nd at 8AM / via: danabulilit / op: nock-nock-nock / 575 notes

(Source: nock-nock-nock)


Jul 21st at 10AM / via: spacehangout / op: spacehangout / 239 notes
spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it. 

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA

spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it.

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA


leomessiforever:

Kaylie-Jade Plott e Messi


Jul 17th at 9AM / via: uncxmfortable / op: themobilemovement / 316,506 notes

(Source: themobilemovement)


marissachantelle:

castnoanchors:

sirbry:

Oh shit

so fucking down

GUYS

marissachantelle:

castnoanchors:

sirbry:

Oh shit

so fucking down

GUYS

(Source: kikibusta)